What language is this?

I’m settling down to a serious read of Eckart Menzler-Trott’s biography of Gentzen. Supposedly the English version. But what language is this?

  • The examination of the mathematics using means and methods of other sciences or humanities is still disgusting for many.
  • One could still learn mathematics today in substance in the writings of Euclid …
  • A bright and conceivable history of modern logic isn’t understandable without one’s biography using conceptual and contextual ideas.
  • … without clarification of historical facts, the different forms of evolving mathematical treatments, methodical and resulting knowledge, and epistemic configurations or its reflection are not once meaningfully describable.

Those are just a selection from just two pages of the Introduction. I’m really grateful to have a rendition of Menzler-Trott’s book into something I can understand. But what on earth were the AMS series editors doing letting this misbegotten prose through?

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3 Responses to What language is this?

  1. Anonymous says:

    Hi!

    I have a question which is totally unrelated to your post; but since you seem to be both a kind and able logician, I thought you might be willing to help.

    My question: Is there a special term for a functional expression (i.e. a singular term forming operator on singular terms) F, which fulfils the following condition:

    AxAy [(F(x)=F(y)) -> x=y]

    Thanks in advance! (By the way, I really enjoy your blog!)

  2. Peter Smith says:

    That makes “F” denote a one-one or injective function. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Injective_function

  3. Anonymous says:

    Thank you!

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